Cut Copy

If you like Cut Copy’s albums, you’ll love their live set. With elegant instrumentation and hard hitting beats, the Aussie trio simply doesn’t disappoint. Add to this mix an opening set by Matt & Kim, a killer light show and a few thousand dancing fans and you’ve got yourself one hell of a concert.

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PHOTOGRAPHER’S NOTES

Cut Copy’s set was one of the more difficult I’ve done lately for no other reason than challenging lighting.
The special LED light rig used on this tour is capable of a wide range of colors but emits very little quality light. The result is largely dark photos with one or more of the RGB channels completely blown. The color casts are so extreme that they cannot be corrected for using the kelvin color temperature settings on camera – they must be left as is or dealt with in post as I have for a number of the images above.

In cases of extreme color casts such as these, I generally try to find either a less extreme white balance setting or a neutral color point from which to completely normalize the color. The neutral point could be the silver mic head or even the whites of a musician’s eyes.

I shot with the 24-70mm and 70-200mm on the Nikon D3 at ISO 3200 and f/2.8 at around 1/250 of a second.

  1. These guys do indeed rock live. I saw them last fall when they had The Presets opening for them. Talk about a dance party!

  2. Unfortunately most of the crowd was oblivious to the Presets, They had to think I was crazy because I shot from the middle of the crowd and I was all over the place with my 30D. Once Cut Copy came on though the crowd got pretty crazy. Do you ever shoot from the crowd after your first 3 up front?

  3. Cool set…seems like a crazy venue…I love how wide number 5 is!

  4. Thanks for the comment Andy. Cut Copy/The Presets must have been a great show! How well the The Presets “harder” style go with the Cut Copy crowd?

  5. Thanks Keith. The Venue is a mixed bag. It’s big, always has a pit and has great professional staff and security. The downside is that the lighting designer almost never uses frontlighting or anything close to what you would consider ideal for photography.

    This may seem like I’m just being a complaining brat photographer, but having no light on the faces of the artists who perform there decreases the likelihood that either artist or venue will appear in the press. I don’t know about you but I can’t remember the last time an editor of mine asked me for a photo so dark that the members of the band couldn’t be identified. =)

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